In the midst of the coronavirus outbreak, many of us are encouraged to work from home if we can. And while it means we can avoid a busy commute, put a wash on while we’re working and have a little more sleep – there are a few downsides, too.

Anyone find themselves working into the evening, constantly checking their emails way beyond their working hours? Yeah, us too. Because it’s difficult to switch off when your home is your office.

But it doesn’t have to be that hard. We spoke to wellbeing experts about how to reclaim your evening at home – rather than getting sucked into work.

Be mindful of where you’re working.

We don’t all have the benefit of having a spare room or office to work in while working from home – but it’s worth trying to work in a room that you’re unlikely to spend the rest of the evening in. Then, when you’re relaxing post-work, it’ll help you ward off that feeling you’re chilling in your office, say James Pacey and Rosa Connor, co-founders of Haptivate, who run happiness at work workshops.

This is also true if you’re working in your bedroom. “It’s good sleep hygiene to only use your bedroom for sleeping – that way your body knows it’s time to switch off when you’re in there, rather than thinking about other things like work.”

Follow a routine in the day.

Having a healthy working routine in the day – where you have a feeling of regularity and rhythm – will allow you to come to a close more easily at the end of the day. Following best work-from-home practices will help, says Suzy Reading, from Work Wellbeing, which delivers employee wellbeing programmes.

“Simple things like making your bed, tidying your work space, throwing open all the curtains to let maximum light in, having a shower and getting into clothes that help you feel put together, eating a nourishing breakfast so you have fed your brain and can think straight,” she adds.

If you follow a routine in the day, you’re more likely to stick to it at the end of the day – by stopping work.

Get out at lunch time – and take breaks.

Switching off from work at home is difficult right in the middle of the day. Physically taking yourself out of the house – even if it’s just a short walk around outside – to take yourself out of that environment as a distraction.

It’s also beneficial to take regular breaks during your workday. “Schedule your day into bitesize pieces,” says Lee Chambers, a workplace wellbeing trainer at Essentialise and environmental psychologist. “Block 90 mins of deep work with 15 minutes of rest, where you disconnect and do something that anchors you in the present. By doing this you work in waves, and this makes it so much easier to flow into a rest wave after work, rather than pushing to burnout all-day.”

Switch off (literally) and unplug.

It’s far less tempting to see if you’ve got a reply to that email, or an update on a project, if your laptop isn’t sat on the table or desk in front of you. Physically putting your laptop screen down, or turning off the computer, will do you the world of good.

Move the laptop into a drawer, or hide it away so you can’t see it. It might also be worth tidying up the work space, signalling that you’re done for the day. “Switch off, unplug and recharge yourself so you can pitch up feeling fresh tomorrow,” says Reading.

Chambers calls this a “digital sunset”, where you shut down your work devices, leave them in the designated work spot, and move to a place where environmentally you relax.

Plan an activity for the end of the day.

First off, you should leave your home when you finish. “Leave your home like you’re leaving work, walk around the block, and return ‘home’,” says Chambers. “Simulating a commute helps you disconnect from work.”

When you’re in an office, at the end of regular working hours, employees say goodbye and announce they’re signing off for the evening. “You can help to draw a boundary between work and home-life by planning an activity to do at the end of the working day,” say Pacey and Connor.

For example, you might do a workout, meditate or call family members at the same time every day, helping you to unplug from work and setting you up to spend your evening relaxing.

This article originally appeared on HuffPost UK.

according to Yoga Journal. To come into the pose, sit up on your hips with legs stretched out together in front of you and toes pointed. Bring your hands under your hips and lean back to prop yourself up on your forearms. Then, lift the chest above the shoulders and drop the head back to the ground behind you. Breathe deeply and rest in the pose for 15-30 seconds. Fish pose “releases tension in the neck, throat, and head, helps stretch the chest muscles and opens up the lungs,” Bielkus says.”,”credit”:”Getty”,”creditUrl”:””,”source”:”http://i.huffpost.com/gadgets/slideshows/318394/slide_318394_2944873_original.jpg”,”thumbnail”:{“url”:{“fileName”:”55a531af1b0000f610280235.jpeg”,”type”:”hectorUrl”},”caption”:”Fish pose is an excellent tension reducer, and can also be therapeutic for fatigue and anxiety, according to Yoga Journal. To come into the pose, sit up on your hips with legs stretched out together in front of you and toes pointed. Bring your hands under your hips and lean back to prop yourself up on your forearms. Then, lift the chest above the shoulders and drop the head back to the ground behind you. Breathe deeply and rest in the pose for 15-30 seconds.nnFish pose “releases tension in the neck, throat, and head, helps stretch the chest muscles and opens up the lungs,” Bielkus says.”,”credit”:”Getty”,”width”:4981,”height”:3712},”title”:”Fish Pose (Matsyasana)”,”type”:”image”,”meta”:null,”summary”:null,”badge”:null},”provider”:null},{“embedData”:{“type”:”hector”,”url”:”https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/55a531b11700001111326c82.jpeg”,”queryParams”:{},”width”:5124,”height”:3410,”credit”:”Getty”},”type”:”image”,”common”:{“id”:”55a531b2e4b0ecec71bd0740″,”caption”:”A forward bend provides a soothing feeling of release — making the pose therapeutic for stress and anxiety — and with the added arm bind, this standing forward bend variation provides a deep shoulder stretch as well. Stand with your feet at hips-width distance, and slowly bend forward from the hips to come into the forward bend. To take the strain off the lower back, bend the knees slightly. Then, try adding an arm bind to stretch the shoulders: Interlace your hands at the lower back and stretch the arms over your head and hands towards the ground in front of you. For those with tight shoulders, hold a belt between your hands, allowing the shoulders to get a deep but less intense stretch. “By binding the hands, you also allow the arms to stretch and tight shoulders to relax,” Bielkus says. “After sitting all day, it’s a great idea to turn your world upside down and bring some blood back to the brain while getting a great stretch for the legs.””,”credit”:”Getty”,”creditUrl”:””,”source”:”http://i.huffpost.com/gadgets/slideshows/318394/slide_318394_2944874_original.jpg”,”thumbnail”:{“url”:{“fileName”:”55a531b11700001111326c82.jpeg”,”type”:”hectorUrl”},”caption”:”A forward bend provides a soothing feeling of release — making the pose therapeutic for stress and anxiety — and with the added arm bind, this standing forward bend variation provides a deep shoulder stretch as well.nnStand with your feet at hips-width distance, and slowly bend forward from the hips to come into the forward bend. To take the strain off the lower back, bend the knees slightly. Then, try adding an arm bind to stretch the shoulders: Interlace your hands at the lower back and stretch the arms over your head and hands towards the ground in front of you. For those with tight shoulders, hold a belt between your hands, allowing the shoulders to get a deep but less intense stretch.nn”By binding the hands, you also allow the arms to stretch and tight shoulders to relax,” Bielkus says. “After sitting all day, it’s a great idea to turn your world upside down and bring some blood back to the brain while getting a great stretch for the legs.””,”credit”:”Getty”,”width”:5124,”height”:3410},”title”:”Standing Forward Fold (Uttanasana)”,”type”:”image”,”meta”:null,”summary”:null,”badge”:null},”provider”:null},{“embedData”:{“type”:”hector”,”url”:”https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/55a531b1140000b6109a80dc.jpeg”,”queryParams”:{},”width”:4368,”height”:2829,”credit”:”Getty”},”type”:”image”,”common”:{“id”:”55a531b1e4b0ecec71bd073e”,”caption”:”Cat-cow tilts can be an effective headache reliever, in addition to opening up the back and stretching the spine. Start with hands and knees on the floor in a tabletop position with a neutral spine. On the inhale, round the spine and curve up into your cat pose (pictured above). On the exhale, arch the back and lift the chest to come into a cow pose. Repeat three to five times, focusing on the breath. “It also helps bring the neck back into the position over the spine — people tend to protrude it forward, and this pose brings the vertebrae back to homeostasis,” Bielkus says.”,”credit”:”Getty”,”creditUrl”:””,”source”:”http://i.huffpost.com/gadgets/slideshows/318394/slide_318394_2944875_original.jpg”,”thumbnail”:{“url”:{“fileName”:”55a531b1140000b6109a80dc.jpeg”,”type”:”hectorUrl”},”caption”:”Cat-cow tilts can be an effective headache reliever, in addition to opening up the back and stretching the spine. Start with hands and knees on the floor in a tabletop position with a neutral spine. On the inhale, round the spine and curve up into your cat pose (pictured above). On the exhale, arch the back and lift the chest to come into a cow pose. Repeat three to five times, focusing on the breath.nn”It also helps bring the neck back into the position over the spine — people tend to protrude it forward, and this pose brings the vertebrae back to homeostasis,” Bielkus says.”,”credit”:”Getty”,”width”:4368,”height”:2829},”title”:”Cat & Cow Pose (Marjaryasana & Bitilasana)”,”type”:”image”,”meta”:null,”summary”:null,”badge”:null},”provider”:null},{“embedData”:{“type”:”hector”,”url”:”https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/55a531b11b00004d11280236.jpeg”,”queryParams”:{},”width”:5038,”height”:3331,”credit”:”Getty”},”type”:”image”,”common”:{“id”:”55a531b1e4b0ecec71bd073f”,”caption”:”This pose helps to open the hips and ease sciatica discomfort that can be made worse by sitting for long periods. Sit up tall with the soles of the feet touching and knees spreading open, bringing the feet in toward the pelvis and clasping your hands around your feet. Flap the knees up and down several times like butterfly wings, then sit still and focus the weight of the hips and thighs into the floor, easing pain in the sciatic nerve. “The sciatic nerve starts in the lower back and runs down both leg, and sciatic nerve pain can occur when the nerve is somehow compressed,” Bielkus says. “Long commutes and sitting for long periods of time exacerbates it.””,”credit”:”Getty”,”creditUrl”:””,”source”:”http://i.huffpost.com/gadgets/slideshows/318394/slide_318394_2944888_original.jpg”,”thumbnail”:{“url”:{“fileName”:”55a531b11b00004d11280236.jpeg”,”type”:”hectorUrl”},”caption”:”This pose helps to open the hips and ease sciatica discomfort that can be made worse by sitting for long periods.nnSit up tall with the soles of the feet touching and knees spreading open, bringing the feet in toward the pelvis and clasping your hands around your feet. Flap the knees up and down several times like butterfly wings, then sit still and focus the weight of the hips and thighs into the floor, easing pain in the sciatic nerve.nn”The sciatic nerve starts in the lower back and runs down both leg, and sciatic nerve pain can occur when the nerve is somehow compressed,” Bielkus says. “Long commutes and sitting for long periods of time exacerbates it.””,”credit”:”Getty”,”width”:5038,”height”:3331},”title”:”Bound Angle Pose (Baddha Konasana)”,”type”:”image”,”meta”:null,”summary”:null,”badge”:null},”provider”:null},{“embedData”:{“type”:”hector”,”url”:”https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/55a531b31b0000f610280237.jpeg”,”queryParams”:{},”width”:4938,”height”:3292,”credit”:”Getty”},”type”:”image”,”common”:{“id”:”55a531b3e4b0ecec71bd0741″,”caption”:”To counter neck discomfort from staring down at a keyboard or phone, Bielkus recommends a few repetitions of yogic slow neck stretches. Sitting in a cross-legged pose, lean the head to the right and extend the left arm and hand toward the ground until you feel a deep stretch on the left side of the neck. Breathe deeply and hold for a few breath cycles, repeating on the other side. You can also try standing in Mountain Pose and stretching the neck to one side, gently pulling with the same hand. “This can also easily be done standing anywhere, even in a cubicle,” she says. “It eases neck tension and strain.””,”credit”:”Getty”,”creditUrl”:””,”source”:”http://i.huffpost.com/gadgets/slideshows/318394/slide_318394_2945032_original.jpg”,”thumbnail”:{“url”:{“fileName”:”55a531b31b0000f610280237.jpeg”,”type”:”hectorUrl”},”caption”:”To counter neck discomfort from staring down at a keyboard or phone, Bielkus recommends a few repetitions of yogic slow neck stretches.nnSitting in a cross-legged pose, lean the head to the right and extend the left arm and hand toward the ground until you feel a deep stretch on the left side of the neck. Breathe deeply and hold for a few breath cycles, repeating on the other side. You can also try standing in Mountain Pose and stretching the neck to one side, gently pulling with the same hand.nn”This can also easily be done standing anywhere, even in a cubicle,” she says. “It eases neck tension and strain.””,”credit”:”Getty”,”width”:4938,”height”:3292},”title”:”Slow Neck Stretches”,”type”:”image”,”meta”:null,”summary”:null,”badge”:null},”provider”:null},{“embedData”:{“type”:”hector”,”url”:”https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/55a531b5170000680d326c83.jpeg”,”queryParams”:{},”width”:5494,”height”:3662,”credit”:”Getty”},”type”:”image”,”common”:{“id”:”55a531b5e4b0ecec71bd074d”,”caption”:””This pose is an accessible back bend for most people,” Bielkus says. “It lengthens the spine, opens up the chest and counteracts sitting hunched over all day.” Lying on the floor, put your hands on the ground slightly in front of you and tuck the elbows into the chest. Push up into your hands, lifting into a slight backbend and drawing the shoulders down. Turn your gaze upwards, and try not to take any tension into the face or jaw.”,”credit”:”Getty”,”creditUrl”:””,”source”:”http://i.huffpost.com/gadgets/slideshows/318394/slide_318394_2945035_original.jpg”,”thumbnail”:{“url”:{“fileName”:”55a531b5170000680d326c83.jpeg”,”type”:”hectorUrl”},”caption”:””This pose is an accessible back bend for most people,” Bielkus says. “It lengthens the spine, opens up the chest and counteracts sitting hunched over all day.”nnLying on the floor, put your hands on the ground slightly in front of you and tuck the elbows into the chest. Push up into your hands, lifting into a slight backbend and drawing the shoulders down. Turn your gaze upwards, and try not to take any tension into the face or jaw.”,”credit”:”Getty”,”width”:5494,”height”:3662},”title”:”Cobra Pose (Bhujangasana)”,”type”:”image”,”meta”:null,”summary”:null,”badge”:null},”provider”:null},{“embedData”:{“type”:”hector”,”url”:”https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/55a531b41400005f0d9a80dd.jpeg”,”queryParams”:{},”width”:4928,”height”:3264,”credit”:”Shuttershock”},”type”:”image”,”common”:{“id”:”55a531b4e4b0ecec71bd0749″,”caption”:”The hips can get tight from long hours of sitting. To improve flexibility and range of motion in the hips, and open up the chest and shoulders, try a half pigeon pose. Start on your hands and knees in a tabletop position, sliding the right knee forward and left leg back, as pictured above, trying to bend the front leg at a 90-degree angle. Sit up tall, and on the exhale, hinge the chest forward and bring the arms out in front of you to feel a deep stretch. “A half pigeon is great for opening up the hips,” Bielkus says. If you’re particularly tight in the hips, try rolling up a blanket under the hips and sitting upright, and then gently hinging forward.”,”credit”:”Shuttershock”,”creditUrl”:””,”source”:”http://i.huffpost.com/gadgets/slideshows/318394/slide_318394_2945045_original.jpg”,”thumbnail”:{“url”:{“fileName”:”55a531b41400005f0d9a80dd.jpeg”,”type”:”hectorUrl”},”caption”:”The hips can get tight from long hours of sitting. To improve flexibility and range of motion in the hips, and open up the chest and shoulders, try a half pigeon pose. Start on your hands and knees in a tabletop position, sliding the right knee forward and left leg back, as pictured above, trying to bend the front leg at a 90-degree angle. Sit up tall, and on the exhale, hinge the chest forward and bring the arms out in front of you to feel a deep stretch.nn”A half pigeon is great for opening up the hips,” Bielkus says.nnIf you’re particularly tight in the hips, try rolling up a blanket under the hips and sitting upright, and then gently hinging forward.”,”credit”:”Shuttershock”,”width”:4928,”height”:3264},”title”:”Half Pigeon Pose (Eka Pada Rajakapotasana)”,”type”:”image”,”meta”:null,”summary”:null,”badge”:null},”provider”:null},{“embedData”:{“type”:”hector”,”url”:”https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/55a531b71b0000f610280238.jpeg”,”queryParams”:{},”width”:5608,”height”:3738,”credit”:”Getty”},”type”:”image”,”common”:{“id”:”55a531b7e4b0ecec71bd075c”,”caption”:””Child’s pose helps us turn inside and slow our minds down,” Virayoga founder Elena Brower recently told The Huffington Post. The foundational resting pose in many yoga classes, the soothing Child’s Pose can help put the mind at ease while also gently opening up the back, hips and shoulders, according to Bielkus. Sit down with your legs folded beneath you, toes touching and knees spread apart from each other. Drape your chest down between your thighs, bringing your forehead to the floor and either extending the arms out in front of you or resting them by your sides. Breathe deeply and rest in the pose for as long as desired.”,”credit”:”Getty”,”creditUrl”:””,”source”:”http://i.huffpost.com/gadgets/slideshows/318394/slide_318394_2945059_original.jpg”,”thumbnail”:{“url”:{“fileName”:”55a531b71b0000f610280238.jpeg”,”type”:”hectorUrl”},”caption”:””Child’s pose helps us turn inside and slow our minds down,” Virayoga founder Elena Brower recently told The Huffington Post.nnThe foundational resting pose in many yoga classes, the soothing Child’s Pose can help put the mind at ease while also gently opening up the back, hips and shoulders, according to Bielkus.nnSit down with your legs folded beneath you, toes touching and knees spread apart from each other. Drape your chest down between your thighs, bringing your forehead to the floor and either extending the arms out in front of you or resting them by your sides. Breathe deeply and rest in the pose for as long as desired.”,”credit”:”Getty”,”width”:5608,”height”:3738},”title”:”Child’s Pose (Balasana)”,”type”:”image”,”meta”:null,”summary”:null,”badge”:null},”provider”:null},{“embedData”:{“type”:”hector”,”url”:”https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/55a531b5140000b6109a80de.jpeg”,”queryParams”:{},”width”:2000,”height”:1333,”credit”:”Flickr:lululemon athletica“},”type”:”image”,”common”:{“id”:”55a531b5e4b0ecec71bd0753″,”caption”:””This pose opens the hips and groin and is very calming for the mind and body,” Bielkus says. Happy Baby Pose is accessible even for beginners, but still provides an excellent stretch for the hip joints, which can get stiff from too much sitting. Lie down on your back, draw the knees into your chest and grab your feet from the inside, pulling them down so the knees extend on either side of your torso. If the stretch is too intense, grab behind your thighs. Try to bring the hips down to the floor. Breathe deeply and rock gently side to side, returning to stillness at your center for 30 seconds.”,”credit”:”Flickr:lululemon athletica“,”creditUrl”:””,”source”:”http://i.huffpost.com/gadgets/slideshows/318394/slide_318394_2945069_original.jpg”,”thumbnail”:{“url”:{“fileName”:”55a531b5140000b6109a80de.jpeg”,”type”:”hectorUrl”},”caption”:””This pose opens the hips and groin and is very calming for the mind and body,” Bielkus says.nnHappy Baby Pose is accessible even for beginners, but still provides an excellent stretch for the hip joints, which can get stiff from too much sitting. Lie down on your back, draw the knees into your chest and grab your feet from the inside, pulling them down so the knees extend on either side of your torso. If the stretch is too intense, grab behind your thighs. Try to bring the hips down to the floor. 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(If you’re having trouble tongue curling, try your best and form a slight “O” with the mouth). Inhale through the mouth, letting the air pass over the tongue, feeling a cool breath, and then exhale through your nose. “Continue long rhythmic breathing for three minutes,” she says. “You’ll feel totally refreshed!””,”credit”:”Getty”,”creditUrl”:””,”source”:”http://i.huffpost.com/gadgets/slideshows/318394/slide_318394_2945072_original.jpg”,”thumbnail”:{“url”:{“fileName”:”55a531b8170000680d326c84.jpeg”,”type”:”hectorUrl”},”caption”:”This cooling breath is the perfect antidote to a long, stressful day. “It releases tension in body and mind, and helps us relieve stress and anger and brings us to a more balanced and clear state,” says Bielkus.nnTo perform this refreshing pranayama exercise, sit in a chair or on the floor in an easy crossed-legged position with your eyes closed. Stick your tongue out and curl up its outer edges. 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12 Yoga Poses To Undo The Damage Of Your Desk Job

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